Category Archives: Canada

Making Breakfast with No Electricity

There are many pluses for living outside the city.  We don’t suffer through the water bans since we are on well-water, not city.  We don’t get (as much) of the odoriferous down draft from the water treatment plant.  We get to be surrounded by forest, and wake up to the sounds of chicken and sheep, with a view of the horses in the pasture through our kitchen window.  We can tromp through our neighbors Enchanted Forest whenever we want, and rarely need to worry about Little Man walking/playing in the road since there are nearly no cars that come our way.  Plus, plus, plus…

However, every now and then, particularly in the winter, we can lose power for a couple of hours at a time.  When that happens it’s means more than simply the inconvenience of blinking clocks and a lack of television.  For us it means no running water since the pump that brings our water from the well is electric.  No showers, no washing, no water for tea or coffee unless we’ve been wise (and sometimes we are) and kept our emergency supplies of water filled along with the large jugs in the refrigerator… which shouldn’t be opened much during these times so it doesn’t “lose its cool.”

Then one morning right at the beginning of winter we woke up to the sound of disconcerting silence (no hum of the old refrigerator) punctuated by the panic inducing beeps of Little Man’s bedroom monitor losing power.  Dave and I stumbled around for a bit, trying to wrap our sleep addled brains around the fact that we had no electricity and what that actually meant for our morning.  I tried to turn on a sink tap to brush my teeth… and nothing happened.  I stood there, staring at the tap, trying to figure out what I was doing wrong.  Apparently Dave was dong something similar in the kitchen since I heard him utter a low moan as realization settled in as to the extent of our dilemma.  No showers… argh!  How to brush our teeth?  My water bottle was still mostly full from yoga the night before.  What about cooking breakfast with our electric stove (or microwave) without electricity?  Doh!

At that point Little Man woke up and I went downstairs to light the wood burning stove (aka our house heater) while Dave went into our son’s room with a flashlight.  I tried to get my brain to function and to think about the breakfast predicament as I knelt by the stove balancing my flashlight beam on the things I needed, but I couldn’t quite get out of autopilot mode.  I arranged the wood, kindling and wadded up burnables in the stove and then lit the whole thing.  Closing the stove door, I waited to make sure that the fire had caught and listened to the comforting clicking of the warming stove.  Then it finally hit me.  I didn’t need electricity to cook our breakfast, I had a wood burning stove right in front of me.  My city-girl mind had only thought of the stove as a heat source for our home.  A smile stretched across my cheeks as I quickly planned our breakfast adventure.

Upstairs Dave was hurriedly getting ready since he had to teach, while also explaining to an unimpressed Little Man why there was no TV for morning cartoons.  For sanity’s sake I whipped out the ipad hoping that it had a charge, and turned on a quick Little Einsteins episode, buying Dave and I a little respite while he got out of the house and I collected my breakfast supplies.

On a large tray I piled a shallow cast iron skillet, a full tea kettle, a hot pad, plates, cutlery, a bowl with two eggs, a couple slices of bread, a mug and tea bag, a filled sippy cup, honey, jam and a few other tools.  I waved Dave out the door, put slippers on Little Man’s feet and was just leading him downstairs while balancing my tray of awesomeness… when with a pop the electricity came back on.  The TV was blaring in the front room since apparently Little Man had pushed in the power button during his desperation to show Dave that the TV worked without electricity.

With the jubilant sounds of a little boy who has found treasure, Little Man dashed back into the living room with Pooh Bear flapping behind him for his morning cartoons.  I looked at my tray, placed it down on the dining room table, snapped a picture for future sleep addled reference, and went back to our now working electric stove to make breakfast.  Next time I’ll be ready when the power is out and we get to have a picnic breakfast downstairs with our wood burning stove.  And I’ll make sure the TV stays off and doesn’t wreck our adventure.

I like the "rustic" look of the black and white photo here.  I felt all "pioneery" as I balanced by tray of modernity to cook on a hot stove.

I like the “rustic” look of the black and white photo here. I felt all “pioneery” as I balanced by tray of modernity to cook on a hot stove.

Hunting Dinosaurs on a Perfect Winter Morning

You are hiking in a cedar forest, the sun steaming the sodden ground where ever it breaks through the trees, periodically pausing to listen for a whistled tune.  The whistle leads you to your prey, because you are hunting dinosaurs.  One dinosaur in fact, a piccolodactyl.  Not familiar with that species?  Then you haven’t been watching Little Einsteins where in one episode the kids imagine dinosaur musical instruments, and a baby piccolodactyl gets separated from its mommy.  Thus began our dinosaur hunt through our neighbors forest.

Carving a path through the wilderness in the Enchanted Forest.

Carving a path through the wilderness in the Enchanted Forest.

This was one of those perfect Spring mornings (though it’s no where near Springtime yet, and I’m ever in wait for the snow dump that we’ll get before true Spring hits) when the sun was out and everything was steaming.  The road.  The trees.  The masses of sodden leaves and conifer needles covering the forest floor.  Our breath.  Little Man and I couldn’t stand the thought of staying inside one moment longer than absolutely necessary, so once we were ready for our public we dashed outside with his balance bike.  Then we coasted down to the original farm house on our street where the owners (they are relative newbies like ourselves, having lived here only 6 months longer than we have) have put in tremendous labor to create an accessible wilderness in their forest land.  Their grandson is Little Man’s age, and they miss the sound of little kids running around and have granted us access to their forest (aka Enchanted Forest) whenever we like.  They don’t know it yet, but there are some gooey cinnamon rolls coming their way soon as a partial “thank you.”

The dog leading Little Man on the dinosaur hunt.

The dog leading Little Man on the dinosaur hunt.

It was to their house and forest that we set out for on our steaming morning.  The dog trailed us contentedly, and Little Man constantly called to her to run with us down the paths of the steaming forest. We take turns whistling like a piccolodactyl and hiding behind mammoth cedars while the other searched for the missing dinosaur.  I should say that I was whistling while Little Man did more of a hooting call.  In the end likely more dinosaur-like than my whistling.

A pond that Little Man wills to be a river.

A pond that Little Man wills to be a river.

After much running, hiding and whistling/hooting, it was eventually time to coast back to our house for lunch.  Before lunch could happen, we needed to visit Little Man’s Ladies to gather eggs, and it was on the way to the chicken coop when Little Man and I noticed that once again the farm was living up to the name I gave this blog (see original post).  The sheep were out.  Although this time it was not “sheep” plural, but singular and tiny.  One of the smallest lambs had crawled out under the gate and could not get back under to get to his momma.  Little Man held the egg basket while I cornered and caught the little lamb, then he got to pet the soft black and white head, cooing “sweet little budgie.”

Pooh Bear under arm, ready to return home for lunch.

Pooh Bear under arm, ready to return home for lunch.

On the whole this has been a lovely farm and wilderness morning.  Hiking through the Enchanted Forest hunting for dinosaurs, snacking by the pond on a Lorax stump, rescuing and cuddling a lamb, gathering eggs and tossing food to “the ladies,” tossing a few winter garden scraps to the pigs, and finally lunching on the bounty of our labors (a couple of the eggs made their way into some fried rice for lunch).  All in all, a lovely winter/spring day.

The Joys of Family and Salmon

Now that the dust is clearing from the end of summer madness (aka family visits, stay-cations, camping trips, summer colds, and an immense amount of food preserving) and the semester is about to begin, I can finally get back to this blog.  I’ve missed writing, but the backlog of recipes and preserving ideas that I want to share here is staggering.

As I sink my fingers into blogging again I wanted to share a photo of one of the most amazing meals I’ve had in a long, long time.  I know I’ve waxed poetic about salmon before, but please forgive me because this bears repetition.

Over the weekend we were able to spend some time with our family up in Campbell River.  While the big draw is getting to hang out with “the Cousins,” a close second is the amazing food we have every time we visit.  This visit was extra special since two cousins who live off island were here to visit and they’d brought their fantastic girlfriends as well.  I’ve been looking forward to getting to hang out with this family for weeks, but I got a bit side tracked when Marcel brought out this amazingly orange salmon to cedar plank smoke for dinner.  The color or the gorgeous fish caught my eye as I was pouring myself a refreshing beverage with the full intention of joining in a conversation with the two ladies that I’d just met.  Then Marcel put the fish on the planks and the perfume of cedar smoke captured my attention entirely.  The smoke pulled me in.

I happily spent the next bit of time chatting with Marcel about salmon, smoking meats, traditional salmon cooking methods, food catering, the bbq circuit, and all things food related.  Our conversation was periodically broken by little peeks at the salmon smoking away as he’d briefly lift the lid to look at how the cook was progressing.  The photo does not do this fish justice.  The smoke pervaded the fish, but didn’t overpower it’s flavor.  It had a citrusy tang with just the right amount of salt to tie it all together.  In the end I made the decision to forgo the dessert offerings for another serving of salmon.  Best dessert choice ever!

The Star of the Show

Saving Your Harvest: The Zucchini Edition

A good friend of mine once described August in Maine as a time of “random acts of zucchini.”  In her small town where people did not necessarily lock the doors of their cars, people would come out of church or the bank or the local cafe to find anonymous bags of zucchini in their front seats.  I found myself envious of those hapless holders of bulging bags of squash.  When we first moved to Vancouver Island one of our neighbors had a bumper crop of zucchini and cucumber, and would offer us bulging bags of produce whenever Little Man and I came walking by.  I would cruse by her house as often as possible with the hopes of catching her eye.

Now that we have our garden of dreams I made sure to plant zucchini, as well as a variety of summer squash called Sunburst (aka Patty Pan).  I had been warned about the size that these plants could achieve, so I wasn’t as surprised by the size of the plant as I was about where the zucchini grew.  At first neither Dave nor I could find the actual zucchini, partly since I imagined zucchini growing like pumpkins stretched out along a long vine.  Instead, they grow like octopus arms, branching out from a central stalk-like structure.  Once we discovered where our squash actually grew, we were off to the races with trying to keep up with preserving and eating our crop.

Zucchini Blossoms

Zucchini blossoms promising a good crop.

I’ll be sharing some of my favorite zucchini recipes soon, but first I want to share a simple way to preserve your zucchini for those times when your garden or farmers’ market may not be producing.  I have been experimenting with (and loving!) pickling and preserving, but I have to say that my favorite method for saving my harvest is my freezer.  Zucchini freezes really well, particularly when it is shredded.

If you have a food processor with a shredding attachment this is going to be the easiest food storage ever.  If all you have is a handheld shredder, that works too.  It just takes a little more elbow grease.  The key to freezing the zucchini is to measure out the portions.  So here’s what I did…

I love my food processor!

I love my food processor!

Using my food processor with the shredding disk attachment, I shredded enough zucchini to fill my large mixing bowl.

The first, but definitely not the last, bowl of shredded zucchini.

The first, but definitely not the last, bowl of shredded zucchini.

I then used my 1 cup measuring cup to portion out mounds of shredded zucchini onto my parchment paper lined baking sheets.  The parchment paper keeps the zucchini from freezing/sticking to the baking sheet.  I was able to fit 6 1-cup mounds on each sheet.  As I unmolded each scoop I would gently press it down to slightly compact the zucchini and to make storing the frozen zucchini easier.  Then I covered the sheet with plastic wrap, gently pressing down between the mounds of zucchini to remove some of the air.  I then placed the entire baking sheet in the freezer overnight.

Measure your zucchini before freezing it so you know exactly how much you need for any recipe.

Measure your zucchini before freezing it so you know exactly how much you need for any recipe.

The unmolded zucchini.

The unmolded zucchini.

Press down on the zucchini to compact it and help it freeze better.

Press down on the zucchini to compact it and help it freeze better.

Filling the sheet pan.

Filling the sheet pan.

A full sheet of future zucchini hockey pucks.

A full sheet of future zucchini hockey pucks.

The next morning we took our little zucchini hockey pucks out of the freezer and put them into bags for their long sleep in the freezer.  Now that they are frozen in 1 cup increments, I can pull them out whenever I want and I’ll know exactly how much I need to thaw.

Lovely, frozen zucchini hockey pucks.

Lovely, frozen zucchini hockey pucks.

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Stay tuned for an amazing zucchini bread recipe… and an even better zucchini brownie recipe… where you can use these frozen zucchini in the dead of winter when nothing is stirring in your garden beyond the snow flakes.

A Garden in Bloom

My garden is not a flower garden.  It was designed as an experiment on growing food to feed myself and my family, and at the moment feels like it could feed a good portion of the island.  I did plant a few plants specifically for their flowers.  Sunflowers were there for the sheer joy of the huge plants, hoping that Little Man would revel in their dinosaur-like proportions.  I also planted Nasturtiums with the goal of eating their blossoms, and so far we’ve had them in salads as well as cocktails.  Beyond that, the only blossoms in my garden either signal the coming fruitfulness of certain plants or the fact that other plants have gone beyond their production.

I wanted to share images of my garden’s blooms here, both the ones promising future harvests and those that signaled it was time to retire the plant to the compost pile.

 

My thyme thinks its time to be done, but the blossoms keep ending up either in my salads or in my windowsills.  Pluck herb blossoms to try to keep the plants producing the delicious leaves you want.

My thyme thinks its time to be done, but the blossoms keep ending up either in my salads or in my windowsills. Pluck herb blossoms to try to keep the plants producing the delicious leaves you want.

We had some random tomato plants "volunteer" from the compost soil, so I planted them between my sunflowers.  They are now just blooming, so we might just have tomatoes in time.

We had some random tomato plants “volunteer” from the compost soil, so I planted them between my sunflowers. They are now just blooming, so we might just have tomatoes in time.

I remember seeing nasturtiums growing wild along the roadside in So. Cal., but here I grow them in my garden for their blossoms... to eat their blossoms I should say...

I remember seeing nasturtiums growing wild along the roadside in So. Cal., but here I grow them in my garden for their blossoms… to eat their blossoms I should say…

I ripped out most of my arugula since it went to flower.  This plant was able to hide behind the chard and I didn't find it until just the other day.

I ripped out most of my arugula since it went to flower. This plant was able to hide behind the chard and I didn’t find it until just the other day.

The most amazing (and intimidating) sight is to peek under the squash leaves (pumpkin, zuchinni and sunburst squash here) to see rows of blossoms.  Yikes!

The most amazing (and intimidating) sight is to peek under the squash leaves (pumpkin, zuchinni and sunburst squash here) to see rows of blossoms. Yikes!

This is one of my favorite blossoms, bush beans.  They are a soft lavender and are beautiful in the garden.

This is one of my favorite blossoms, bush beans. They are a soft lavender and are beautiful in the garden.

I've never planted scarlet runner beans before.  They have conquered their tripods and are now stringing along to other posts.  I can't wait to see what their beans look like.

I’ve never planted scarlet runner beans before. They have conquered their tripods and are now stringing along to other posts. I can’t wait to see what their beans look like.

For my last photo I wanted to share the opening sunflower blossom.  This one is right at my eye level, so it towers over Little Man.  Love it!

For my last photo I wanted to share the opening sunflower blossom. This one is right at my eye level, so it towers over Little Man. Love it!

I can’t wait to share with you some of our produce preservation we’re working on!  Even better I can’t wait to taste the fruit of our labor.

A Riot of Gorgeous Greens: AKA My Garden Has Gone Mad

A couple of days ago I stepped out of the house during Little Man’s nap time to do a little gathering from the garden.  As I stood there gazing at its splendor, I felt a wave of panic wash over me as it finally dawned on me the extent of how many greens I’d planted.  I remember when we first moved to the American Midwest and I was horrified by the lack of greens available in the stores.  Miles of ice berg lettuce, but only a few sad strands of wilted chard that were egregiously overpriced.  So this year, with the massive garden plot at my disposal I went nuts at the seed counter of the local nursery.  And apparently I was transfixed with the greens, since I planted purple kale, dinosaur kale (aka Tuscan kale, but I’m the mother of a toddler so dinosaur it is), rainbow chard, all of the lettuces I’ve already spoken about, AND there are rows of beets with their gorgeous greens as well.  Oy!

Tuscan kale, rainbow chard, mystery pumpkin, beets, carrots, radishes and nasturtiums... Oh my!

Tuscan kale, rainbow chard, mystery pumpkin, beets, carrots, radishes and nasturtiums… Oh my!

This week at the garden has been all about thinning out the plants that were planted too close.  It was hard at first to rip these precious little plants out by their roots, but I “thinned” them directly into the salad bowl… until that bowl over flowed… and so did three plastic shopping bags.  Remember that moment of panic I mentioned above?

Also beans, beans and more beans.

Also beans, beans and more beans.

At that moment Dave walked out onto the deck, stepped over my multiple bowls and bags of greens (including a huge bowl of radishes), and started laughing since even though he could see the evidence of my savagery on the garden displayed across the deck… the garden still looked the same.  A riot of gorgeous greens.

This is the most gorgeous rainbow chard I've ever seen.  The orange stems are my current favorite, but the red, magenta, yellow and white together make an astonishing sight.

This is the most gorgeous rainbow chard I’ve ever seen. The orange stems are my current favorite, but the red, magenta, yellow and white together make an astonishing sight.

Pumpkin Revisited

OK, I’ve got to be quick since I have a three foot high pile of kale sitting in my sink that needs to be tended to.  Oy!  I’ll be sharing more about how we are preserving/saving our harvest in upcoming posts, but right now we’re in the thick of things so there is little time for blog writing.  I can’t wait to share with you the recipes/methods that we are experimenting with now.  Especially the gooseberries… oh, the gooseberries.

In the meantime I wanted to quickly share with you pictures of Little Man’s pumpkins (at least a couple of them) that I wrote about in the last post.

Trail of Pumpkins

This is one of the four main vines trailing off of Little Man’s mystery pumpkin. Note the small chameleon watering can that Little Man was using to “water” the pumpkins. He literally was watering the pumpkins, not the vine body.

This pumpkin is massive!  Note the small watering can being dwarfed behind it.  Our farmer landlords have already offered us the use of their tractor to move it once it's ready to be picked... Oh my...

This pumpkin is massive! Note the small watering can being dwarfed behind it. Our farmer landlords have already offered us the use of their tractor to move it once it’s ready to be picked… Oh my…

Now back to my mountain of kale.  I’ll share more pictures and ideas soon!

The Sheep Are Out… Again

This is not what I meant to post tonight, but then I left for yoga.  I was balancing yoga mat, water bottle, purse, all being held in an unintentionally awkward way.  As I stepped up to the car, purse now open while I fished out the keys, I glanced to my left towards my garden and stopped stunned.  Not quite understanding what I was seeing.  Was there truly a herd of sheep on my sidewalk?  And were they supposed to be there?  Then I noticed our farmer-landlord running towards me, summer dress flapping and sheep feed bucket waving towards the errant flock.  It then took me a moment to grab my phone from the awkwardly held purse and snap the pictures before shoeing the sheep along.

This is when I started feeling like I was back in Turkey.  I was “hut! hutting!” like the village shepard, moving the sheep toward their pasture, though I think the flapping yoga mat would stand out a bit on the Turkish prairies.

What made that moment so perfect, was that exactly one year ago tonight… almost to the exact hour and minute…  Dave, Little Man and I were just sitting down with Dave’s parents, Ruth and Joe, for dinner when Joe looked out the window and said “The sheep are out…” That simple phrase ended up inspiring this blog and forever keeps me laughing even a year later… and especially when a year later the same situation is happening.  To read that original post, click here.

We’ve now officially lived in Canada for one year.  Not too bad, eh?

One Year More...

Oh, Canada!

My next post will continue the recipes from Dave’s Graduation Party, so if you are waiting for those do not despair.  They are coming, and soon!  This post is a “break from your expected programming” inspired by the fact that Canada Day is just around the corner.  I wanted to share this craft idea with you before the holiday has passed us by, hence the interruption in the grad party recipes.  Spoiler Alert!!!  If you are one of Little Man’s Papas avert your eyes, since this is also your belated Father’s Day gift.  Well, OK… you can peek…  I just wish that I’d been able to get the shirts to you before this was posted.  🙂

The original idea comes from the workmanfamily website, and I thought it was fantastic!  If you would like to see their original post, please click here.

I thought that the workmanfamily post’s idea of using a kid’s hand print as the maple leaf in a Canadian flag was brilliant, and the bonus is that it doesn’t take many supplies beyond a t-shirt and fabric paint.  From the original wormanfamily post they shared the idea of using an empty cereal box for the cardboard to put inside the shirt to keep the paint from seeping from one side of the fabric to the back side as well.  Just another example of renew, reuse, recycle.
Love it!

I was able to get good quality t-shirts on one of those major chain mega sales!  I used a torn up box from our recycle bin for the cardboard between the shirt layers.

I was able to get good quality t-shirts on one of those major chain mega sales! I used a torn up box from our recycle bin for the cardboard between the shirt layers.

I used a small plastic plate to hold the fabric paint, and it was just the perfect size for Little Man's hand.

I used a small plastic plate to hold the fabric paint, and it was just the perfect size for Little Man’s hand.

We did three shirts in one go, so set up the little work area for Little Man's hand prints.

We did three shirts in one go, making a little assembly line for Little Man’s hand prints.

Then I started the bars.  I began by painting the main column.

Then I started the bars. I began by painting the main column.

Then I went back and darkened in the column.

Then I went back and darkened in the column.

They I went back and strengthened the straight lines on all four edges.

They I went back and strengthened the straight lines on all four edges.  I know the edges don’t look straight here, but that’s partly from the rotation of the image.  It’s also a craft, so I can claim “rustic” just like in cooking and that makes it look better, right?

Oh, Canada!

Oh, Canada!

Two shirts for Papas and one for Daddy!

Two shirts for Papas and one for Daddy!

This Canada Day marks our one year anniversary for living in this amazing nation!  What an awesome and crazy year this has been.  I can’t wait to see what this next year has in store…

A Tale of Two Parties: Our Island Party and the Food

Now that we set the stage with the amazing party in New West… no pressure, right?  Oy…  Now I have to begin with confessing that some how, and I’m not exactly sure what happened, but we ended up with next to no pictures from Dave’s graduation party at our house.  I know…  I don’t know what happened…  I did, luckily, take pictures of the food (mostly) while I was preparing the dishes so at least that’s something.  But seriously… no pictures?  Ugh…

Here's our happy graduate!

Here’s our happy graduate!

On the brighter side, let’s talk about food.  Here’s the menu for Dave’s graduation party.

Dave’s Graduation Party Menu
Spiedies: Italian marinated pork or chicken that is skewered and grilled. Served on a bun with sauteed onions, mustard and mayonnaise.
White T-Shirt Shrimp: A Cajun spiced shrimp boil with beer and butter. Served with bread to dip.
Utica Pie: A deep dish tomato and parmesan “pie” with a Chicago-style crust.
Red, White and Blue Coleslaw: An homage to one of our favorite restaurants in Ithaca, NY, this is red cabbage, white cabbage and blue cheese slaw.
Half Moon Cookies: Made famous through Seinfeld, these Black and White cookies are claimed to have originated in Utica, NY, as Half Moons.

A fantastic blend of neighbors, family and friends.  What an amazing blessing!

A fantastic blend of neighbors, family and friends. What an amazing blessing!

It’ll take me a few posts to get all of the recipes posted, but today we are going to start with the Spiedies and White T-Shirt Shrimp, the two recipes that I don’t have images for.  This just means that you’ll have to try the recipes and send me pictures from your creations.  🙂  I’d love to see them!

Spiedies are a classic Binghamton, NY, dish.  This is the perfect festival food from Binghamton, honored yearly by the Spiedie Fest.  In fact, at my bachlorette party my fantastic ladies made a version to serve along with other bites of New York.  I hope I did them all justice with this recipe.  While the pork spiedie is the classic, we also offered a chicken version.  They were both delicious, especially with a heap of sauteed onions.

Spiedies
Ingredients
:
5 lbs. of pork loin or chicken, cubed
2 cups plus ¼ cup olive oil
½ cup cider vinegar
1 tbsp. smoked paprika
1 tbsp. dried oregano
1 tbsp. dried thyme
1 tbsp. dried basil
1 tbsp. dried rosemary
1 tbsp. garlic powder
4 large onions, peeled and thinly sliced
Salt and pepper

Directions:

  1. Combine the meat with 2 cups of olive oil, the vinegar, and all the dried spices in a large, nonreactive bowl or resealable plastic bag. If using a plastic bag be sure to place it in a casserole dish or other walled dish or bowl in case of any leaks. Place the meat and marinade in the refrigerator and chill for several hours or overnight. In a pinch, 30 minutes will get you some flavor, but longer is better.
  2. Meanwhile heat ¼ cup of olive oil in a large skillet over medium high heat and add the onions. Be prepared to cry a little… or a lot. Season with salt and pepper. Sauté the onions until they start to brown on the edges, then turn down the heat to medium and slowly cook them until they are soft and golden. Taste for seasoning and adjust if necessary. Put the onions into a serving bowl and set aside. If making the spiedies in advance you can refrigerate the onions for up to 2 days and then reheat them in the microwave before setting them out with the other condiments and buns.
  3. When you are ready to grill the meat, prepare the skewers. Skewer the meat, leaving some space between the cubes to ensure even cooking. If using bamboo skewers be sure to soak them according to package directions in advance. Grill the skewers over high heat to get a char on your kebabs. Depending on the size of your cubes this can happen quickly, so watch them like a hawk. Test individual skewers to ensure for doneness.
  4. Remove the meat from the skewers and place it in a serving bowl. Serve the grilled meat with torpedo buns, the delicious, golden onions, as well as mustard and mayonnaise. Enjoy!

Please click here for a printable version of the Spiedies recipe.

Our front yard was festooned with balloons... and then we spent the entire time on our fantastic new back deck.  Ah well...

Our front yard was festooned with balloons… and then we spent the entire time on our fantastic new back deck. Ah well…

I cannot believe that I don’t have a single picture of the White T-Shirt Shrimp served at the party.  Ugh!  So you’ll just have to use your great imaginations to picture a vat of spicy sauce comprised predominately of butter and beer with succulent shrimp, served in bowls with crusty bread to soak up that delicious sauce.  My mouth is already watering…  The name for this dish comes from when Dave first tried it at a wonderful cabin (aka “camp”) up on Otter Lake.  He was wearing a brand new, white t-shirt he’d received for his birthday.  He took one bite of a shrimp, and watched the tail flip down in slow motion splattering his front with bright red, spicy butter sauce.  Dave now recommends a bib when eating these shrimp, but I’d wear a trash bag if I had to just to get a bowl of that sauce with a hunk of bread.  At the party we served the White T-Shirt Shrimp on a warming tray with a platter of warmed baguettes next to it to keep them both hot throughout the party.

White T-Shirt Shrimp
Ingredients
:
4 bottles of beer
¾ cup Worcestershire sauce
½ cup Cajun spice
4 lemons, juiced
1 lb. butter
5 lbs. shrimp, shell on, uncooked

Directions:

  1. Heat all of the ingredients except for the shrimp in a large pot. Bring the liquid to a simmer and cook for 2-3 minutes.
  2. Add the shrimp and cook for 7-8 minutes or until the shrimp are pink and cooked through.
  3. Serve with bowls and lots of crusty bread to soak up the amazing boil. Enjoy!

Please click here for a printable version of the White T-Shirt Shrimp recipe.

 

New DeckStay tuned for more recipes… with pictures… from the party!  😉